Botswana

The San, the Balala, the Nama and their subgroups are the indigenous peoples of Botswana. Although Botswana voted in favor and adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the indigenous peoples of the country are not recognized by the government and are among the most disadvantaged people of Botswana, with a high percentage of life by below the poverty line.

Botswana is a signatory to the Conventions on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), on the rights of the child (CRC) and on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination (CERD).

However, Botswana has not signed ILO 169, the international legal instrument that specifically addresses the rights of indigenous and tribal peoples. In addition, there are no specific laws on the rights of indigenous peoples in the country nor is the concept of indigenous peoples included in the constitution of Botswana.

Although the Government of Botswana does not recognize any specific ethnic group as indigenous to the country, 2.9% of the population is identified as belonging to indigenous groups. Mainly they reside in the region of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana and include the San (also known as the Basarwa), which number about 64,000, the Balala, around 1,750, and the Nama, who number about 2,200.

While the Nama is a Khoekhoe-speaking people, the San belong to a large number of subgroups, most of which have their own language. They include the Ju / 'hoansi, Bugakhwe, Khwe-ǁAni, Ts'ixa, ǂX'ao-ǁ'aen,! Xóõ, ǂHoan, ‡ Khomani, Naro, G / ui, G // ana, Tsasi, Deti, Shua, Tshwa, Danisi and / Xaise.

Main challenges for the San, Balala and Nama

It remains a struggle for indigenous peoples in Botswana to remain on their lands. People living in protected areas are under constant threat of being relocated by central government or district councils.

Another struggle of the indigenous peoples of Botswana is the drought. Although President Khama has declared a national drought emergency authorizing food deliveries and cash-for-work programs in many parts of the country, there have been no food deliveries or pensions to the villages in the Central Kalahari Game or in the village of Ranyane. .

The fracking is being carried out by oil and mining companies in what is known as the Nama Basin in the Kgalagadi District. Residents of the communities of San and Bakgalagadi have complained that fracking results in a drop in the water table, less access to water from the well in the village and high levels of toxic chemicals and salts in the water, which makes it Virtually not drinkable.
 
Discussions about non-hunting and anti-poaching policies in Botswana continue to intensify, while the Ministry of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism defends the political controversy to address threats to Botswana's wildlife base. The people of San have been pressing the government for a greater explanation of their wildlife policies and the search for compensation for crops, livestock and the loss of human lives to wild animals.

Advances in cultural and political participation

In August 2016, a Nama cultural festival was held in the Kgalagadi district and a Kuru dance festival in Dqae Qare. The Kuru Dance Festival brought together the San, Bakgalagadi, Mbukushu, Herero, Tswana and many other peoples from around the world. the country, and it was an expression of cultural pride on the part of the groups.

Some San also participated in the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the independence of Botswana held in Gaborone in September 2016.
 
San organizations and other NGOs in Botswana had problems in part due to lack of funds in 2016. San Youth Network (SYNet) continued to publish on their websites written by young people about women's rights, children's rights and the climate change.

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