Canada

The indigenous peoples of Canada are collectively known as Aboriginal peoples. Canada recognizes three groups of Aboriginal peoples: Indians, Inuit and Métis. Aboriginal peoples in Canada are challenged by the slow implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, child welfare and violence against indigenous women and girls.

In 2010, the Canadian government announced its support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2007. This decision was a reversal of Canada's previous opposition to the Declaration, which he pursued together with Australia, the United States and New Zealand. All have reviewed their attitude towards the Declaration.

The Government of Canada has highlighted four important principles that govern its relations with indigenous peoples. These are the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Unfortunately, these principles seem to come with little more than political rhetoric. In addition, Canada has not ratified ILO Convention 169.

The Constitutional Act of Canada of 1982 recognizes and affirms Aboriginal and Existing Treaties of Aboriginal Peoples. In addition, the Supreme Court of Canada has called for the reconciliation of "pre-existing aboriginal sovereignty with the supposed sovereignty of the Crown."

Aboriginal peoples and First Nations

According to the 2011 census, 1,400,685 people in Canada had an aboriginal identity, accounting for 4.3% of the total Canadian population. 851,560 people identified as First Nations people, representing 60.8% of the total Aboriginal population and 2.6% of the total Canadian population.

The First Nations, referred to as Indians in the Constitution and generally registered under the Indigenous Act of Canada, are a diverse group, representing more than 600 First Nations and more than 60 languages. About 55% live in the reserve and 45% reside in urban, rural, special access and remote areas outside the reserve. The métis constitute a distinct aboriginal nation, with 451,795 in 2011, many of whom live in urban centers, mainly in western Canada.

Main challenges for the indigenous peoples of Canada

Indigenous peoples and their allies are challenged by the slowness of substantive action on the implementation of the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of the United Nations. Even with a support government at the federal level, implementation remains a challenge for the state. The causes of this include pressures from the corporate sector and disputes within the government about how the implementation could move forward.

Another struggle is related to child welfare. The Canadian Court of Human Rights (CHRT) ruled that the First Nations Children and Families Services Program (FNCFS), provided by the Government of Canada through the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC), has denied services of child welfare to many First Nations Children and families living in the reserves. Despite welcoming the decision and swearing to act, the Canadian government has not complied.

It is worth noting that Canada has presented itself before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (CIDH) at the Organization of American States (OAS) regarding both the issues of violence against indigenous women and girls and the current discrimination against them.

Possible progress for the indigenous peoples of Canada

After many years of national and international calls, Canada launched a national investigation into indigenous women and girls killed and disappeared in 2016. The commission should recommend actions to eliminate the systemic causes of violence and increase the safety of indigenous women and girls .

The recommendations will be made to the government through an interim report before November 1, 2017 and a final report by November 1, 2018. Indigenous communities and political organisations have welcomed the investigation, but have also expressed concerns for the slow start and raised with respect to transparency.

In February, the Prime Minister announced a working group of ministers to review and decolonize all federal laws, policies and operational practices, including to ensure consistency with the UN Declaration. This work should be carried out in consultation with indigenous peoples. While the working group met and presumably worked on this critical task, the commitment with representatives of indigenous peoples and other experts was unfortunately minimal.

In late 2016, the Prime Minister announced new bilateral mechanisms between the federal government and the three national representative bodies for indigenous peoples: the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis nation. Such a formalized relationship between the federal government and indigenous peoples is certainly a step to improve relationships and work in a more collaborative manner.

Der er ingen artikler i denne kategori. Hvis underkategorier vises på denne side, så indeholder de måske artikler.
Algeriet

Algeriet

Angola

Angola

Aotearoa/New Zealand

Aotearoa/New Zealand

Argentina

Argentina

Australien

Australien

Bangladesh

Bangladesh

Botswana

Botswana

Bolivia

Bolivia

Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso

Brasilien

Brasilien

Cameroon

Cameroon

Canada

Canada

China

China

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Colombia

Colombia

Chile

Chile

Den Demokratiske Republik Congo

Den Demokratiske Republik Congo

Ecuador

Ecuador

Eritrea

Eritrea

Etiopien

Etiopien

Filippinerne

Filippinerne

Fransk Guyana

Fransk Guyana

Fransk Polynesien

Fransk Polynesien

Guatemala

Guatemala

Grønland

Grønland

India

India

Indonesien

Indonesien

Israel

Israel

Japan

Japan

Kanaky/Ny Kaledonien

Kanaky/Ny Kaledonien

Kenya

Kenya

Laos

Laos

Libyen

Libyen

Mali

Mali

Malaysia

Malaysia

Marokko

Marokko

Mexico

Mexico

Myanmar

Myanmar

Namibia

Namibia

Nepal

Nepal

Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Niger

Niger

Panama

Panama

Paraguay

Paraguay

Palestina

Palestina

Peru

Peru

Republikken Congo

Republikken Congo

Rusland

Rusland

Sápmi

Sápmi

Sydafrika

Sydafrika

Surinam

Surinam

Taiwan

Taiwan

Tanzania

Tanzania

Thailand

Thailand

Tunesien

Tunesien

Uganda

Uganda

USA

USA

Venezuela

Venezuela

Vietnam

Vietnam

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Om IWGIA

IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs - er en global menneskerettigheds-organisation, der er dedikeret til at fremme, beskytte og forsvare oprindelige folks rettigheder.

Indigenous World

IWGIA's globale rapport, the Indigenous World, giver et overblik over situationen for oprindelige folk i hele verden. Download her.

Kontakt IWGIA

Prinsessegade 29 B, 3. sal
DK 1422 København 
Danmark
Telefon: (+45) 53 73 28 30
E-mail: iwgia@iwgia.org
CVR: 81294410

Information: Vi bruger cookies og tilsvarende teknologier

Læs mere

Jeg accepterer